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When To Use “Though” and “Although”

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If you’re here, you’re probably wondering if there’s a difference between “though” and “although.” Most of the time, they can be used interchangeably. Learn more about “though” and “although” below.

Although or Though? | Though versus Although
“Although” and “though” are conjunctions.
Quick Summary on “Although” and “though”
  • As conjunctions, although and though mean “in spite of the fact.”
  • When used as conjunctions, although and though can be interchanged.
    • I went to the gym, although I was extremely tired.
      I went to the gym, though I was extremely tired.
  • Though can also function as an adverb, but although cannot. In this case, these two words cannot be interchanged.
    • ○ ✅ We met a while back, but he said he didn’t remember me, though.
      ○ ❌ We met a while back, but he said he didn’t remember me, although.

“Although” vs. “Though”

Though and although are both subordinating conjunctions—words that connect a dependent clause to an independent clause. Subordinating conjunctions are found at the beginning of a dependent clause and explain sequence, action, results, or other valuable information.

  • We were excited to finish the school year, although we were really going to miss each other.

In the example above, although connects the dependent clause to the independent clause. Although both these words can be used as conjunctions, only though can also function as an adverb. We’ll elaborate and provide examples in the following paragraphs.

What's the difference between though and although?
“Although” and “though” can be interchanged when used as conjunctions.

When Can “Although” and “Though” Be Used Interchangeably?

Although and though are conjunctions that mean “in spite of the fact that.”

I rode a rollercoaster today, in spite of the fact that I’m terrified of heights.
I rode a rollercoaster today, although I’m terrified of heights.
I rode a rollercoaster today, though I’m terrified of heights.

When used as conjunctions, although and though can be used interchangeably without altering the meaning of the sentence. Although has the reputation of being more formal, but both of these options can be found in formal and informal writing.

You should add a comma after the although or though clause if it comes before the main clause.

Although I was skeptical, I bought the product from the infomercial.
Though I was skeptical, I bought the product from the infomercial.

However, place the comma after the main clause if it comes before the subordinate (although or though) clause.

I bought the product from the infomercial, although I was skeptical.
I bought the product from the infomercial, though I was skeptical.
Bonus Tip

When it comes to comma placements, there are many rules to remember. Luckily, LanguageTool can help with missing or superfluous commas. This multilingual text editor works with various programs (like Word, Google Docs, and more) and can correct spelling and grammar errors. Try the online tool today.


When Can “Although” and “Though” Not Be Used Interchangeably?

Occasionally, though is used as an adverb that means “however” or “nevertheless.”

It takes a long time to complete. It’s worth it, though.

Although can never be used as an adverb, and therefore cannot replace though in this sentence.

It takes a long time to complete. It’s worth it, although.

Another point worth making is that sometimes even is added to though in order to add emphasis.

They hugged even though they just had a big fight.

However, even never accompanies although.

They hugged even although they just had a big fight.


“Though” and “Although”: Final Thoughts

If you’re unfamiliar with these two words, knowing when they can be used interchangeably can take some practice. Keep in mind:

  • Though and although can be interchanged if they’re connecting the main clause to a subordinate clause.
  • Though can be used as an adverb, whereas although cannot. In other words, although can never be the last word of a sentence.

And if you want to play it safe, opt for always using though. Since it works in either case (as a conjunction or adverb) you can’t go wrong.


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